Places I Love – Fremantle Beaches

Words and pictures by Jean Hudson @jeansodyssey – A regular column by our resident traveller

* This article was completed just before Bondi Beach in Sydney was closed due to crowding. It seems beaches here are not closed, not yet. To keep them open we must avoid overcrowding and observe the social distancing rules when we visit the beach. It seems to us at FSN that beach goers so far have been good at self regulating.

Let’s keep doing the right thing. Some of Jean’s fab photos below depict scenes that would not now be considered appropriate as there are probably too many folk with their mutts more or less in the same place. That said, let’s keep exercising common sense so we can keep walking and exercise on our beautiful beaches.

The Coronavirus situation is changing each day, affecting each and every one of our lives in one way or another and creating unsettling and unprecedented times. Social distancing does not mean social isolation and staying at home.
It is a well-known fact that spending time in the great outdoors reduces stress, calms anxiety, boosts your mood and improves mental health.
On Friday, I took my dog to Leighton dog-beach; the water was turquoise and calm. There were only a couple of people on the beach. Floating in the calm water and looking up into an impossibly blue sky, I could have been anywhere in the world and I was mindful of how lucky I am to live where I do.
Around Fremantle we have kilometers of white sandy beaches where we can walk and swim and enjoy the curative properties of the seawater and coastal air.
Thalassotherapy stems from the ancient Greek words “Thalassa” for sea and “therapia” for treatment. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans visited the sea for wellbeing and health. Seawater and human plasma are composed of similar elements, when the body is immersed in seawater the pores open up, allowing minerals and trace elements (such as magnesium, potassium, calcium, iodine and sodium) to enter. These elements restore the chemical balance in the body and increase resistance to external toxins. Sea air is high in ions and improves respiration.
North Fremantle
Leighton Beach in North Fremantle is four kilometres north of Fremantle. It has soft white sand and turquoise ocean. It is safe for swimming and snorkeling and a favorite spot for joggers, walkers, surfers, wind surfers and kite surfers. The northern end of the beach is dog friendly.
Port Beach runs from Leighton to Fremantle Harbour’s North Quay. Like Leighton, the waves are small and it is safe for swimming and snorkeling. From these beaches you can watch ships entering and leaving the port and see Rottnest Island in the distance.
River Beach
This beautiful stretch of river beach has calm water and views across the river. It’s a popular place to picnic or relax and watch the world go by. This beach is at the end of Johannah Street beside the Gilbert Fraser Reserve.
Fremantle
Bather’s Beach is one of Fremantle’s favourite local beaches. The water is usually calm and offers safe swimming. It is centrally located between the Maritime Museum and Challenger Harbour in Fremantle’s fashionable West end. There is a free beach-wheelchair service. To book contact WA Shipwrecks Museum on 1300 134 081 or email reception@museum.wa.gov.au.
South Fremantle
South Beach(South) is a popular spot for locals with a white sandy beach surrounded by grassy parkland and a large car park. From the beach are views of the boat harbour and out to sea, Garden and Carnac Islands. South beach also has a beach wheel chair, call the City of Fremantle on 9432 9999 or bookings@fremantle.wa.gov.au
South Beach (North – or Dog Beach)
The northern part of South Beach begins at Fremantle Sailing Club and runs 400m south to the groyne. This is a dog friendly beach and also has a grassed off-lead area.
For the moment, we are unable to visit tropical palm fringed beaches. However, there is nothing stopping us – subject to meeting the social distancing rules – from visiting our local beaches to feel the sand between our toes. You can’t beat a walk on these beaches as the sun sets over the Indian Ocean.

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